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Wybrane czynniki decydujące o jakości pasz dla zwierząt laboratoryjnych i ich wpływ na wyniki doświadczeń

Radko Lidia, Stypuła-Trębas Sylwia, Posyniak Andrzej

Zakład Farmakologii i Toksykologii,

Państwowy Instytut Weterynaryjny - Państwowy Instytut Badawczy w Puławach

Streszczenie. Zaspokajanie potrzeb żywieniowych zwierząt jest jednym z podstawowych czynników w hodowli zwierząt. Jakość paszy ma bezpośredni wpływ na wyniki prowadzonych doświadczeń, ponieważ jej skład decyduje o zapewnieniu dobrostanu zwierząt. Proces wytworzenia paszy oraz warunki produkcji, magazynowania i dostarczenia do hodowcy mogą również wpływać na jakość stosowanego w żywieniu zwierząt produktu. Wybór wysokiej jakości paszy ma zasadnicze znaczenie dla zapewnienia zdrowia i dobrostanu zwierząt oraz integralności uzyskanych wyników prowadzonych doświadczeń.

Słowa kluczowe: pasza, zwierzęta laboratoryjne, magazynowanie, doświadczenia na zwierzętach

 

Selected factors determining the quality of feed for laboratory animals and their impact on the results of experiments

Summary. Satisfying the nutritional needs of animals is one of the basic factors in animal husbandry. The quality of feed has a direct impact on the results of experiments, because its composition determines the animal welfare. The process of feed production as well as the conditions of production, storage and delivery to the breeder may also affect the quality of the product used in animal nutrition. The choice of high-quality feed is essential to ensure the health and welfare of animals and the integrity of the results obtained.

Key words: feed, laboratory animals, storage, animal experiments

 

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